(Source: texts-from-the-brownstone)

56 notes

elementarystan:

Lucy Liu steps off screen and behind the camera for her Elementary directorial debut! Don’t miss the episode when it airs Thursday, May 1st.

elementarystan:

Lucy Liu steps off screen and behind the camera for her Elementary directorial debut! Don’t miss the episode when it airs Thursday, May 1st.

194 notes

mellopetitone:

goldenheartedrose:

fullelven-manaaddict:

kazifer:

thankyoucorndog:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"enjoy these historical rocks god damn it you’re eight years old"

Maybe I was a weird kid, but I distinctly remember from the age of 5 wanting to go visit places like this. If my parents had taken me, they couldn’t have gotten a video game to hold my attention for even a minute. I would have given anything…

Video games are nice for kids to have when they go on vacation, especially those that have sensory or social anxiety issues, because it gives them something else to focus on other than what makes them nervous. Video games can also be great for stimming for those of us who have what I like to call “hand stems” because it keeps your hands busy.
I’ve always had to do two things at once in order to take in information, which my teachers learned after half a year of me drawing or writing stories in their classes while they taught and still retaining all the information they were putting out.
Don’t villianize the parent or the video game, you don’t know the whole story.

^^ that basically.

Everyone is my family is pretty strongly bothered by how hyperfocused my little brother (who’s diagnosed ASD) is on video games. He’s always got his DS when he’s out and he plays it straight through meals out, which is mostly when I see him now. And I can understand wanting him to be more present, but I remember being in elementary school, too, and my choice of medium was books. When I remember that and when I think about the sensory hell of most restaurants, I’m not bothered.
If family is looking for explicit evidence he loves them (which seems plausible to me as talking is my main form of bonding and we don’t talk much because he tends to prefer games in public) then they just have to look at how he reacts when someone walks in the room. Any time some new family member comes in the room (especially people who aren’t so strongly coded as adults, like his siblings even though we’re all 8-15 years older), he drops what he’s doing, yells their name, and runs to glomp onto them. (My family is nearly all allistic and almost as many are NT so there’s a lot of not understanding where my little brother is coming from.)

I’ve been to Stonehenge. It’s extremely windy. You can’t touch the stones because it’s roped off (I understand them wanting to preserve the stones, but still). You walk around in a circle and take pictures while being surrounded by a massive crowd of people who are doing the same thing.
Stonehenge is kind of like Mount Rushmore (which I’ve also been to) where it seems like a good time, but is disappointing up close. At least, to me.
I don’t blame the kid AT ALL because I’d also find the game more interesting.

mellopetitone:

goldenheartedrose:

fullelven-manaaddict:

kazifer:

thankyoucorndog:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"enjoy these historical rocks god damn it you’re eight years old"

Maybe I was a weird kid, but I distinctly remember from the age of 5 wanting to go visit places like this. If my parents had taken me, they couldn’t have gotten a video game to hold my attention for even a minute. I would have given anything…

Video games are nice for kids to have when they go on vacation, especially those that have sensory or social anxiety issues, because it gives them something else to focus on other than what makes them nervous. Video games can also be great for stimming for those of us who have what I like to call “hand stems” because it keeps your hands busy.

I’ve always had to do two things at once in order to take in information, which my teachers learned after half a year of me drawing or writing stories in their classes while they taught and still retaining all the information they were putting out.

Don’t villianize the parent or the video game, you don’t know the whole story.

^^ that basically.

Everyone is my family is pretty strongly bothered by how hyperfocused my little brother (who’s diagnosed ASD) is on video games. He’s always got his DS when he’s out and he plays it straight through meals out, which is mostly when I see him now. And I can understand wanting him to be more present, but I remember being in elementary school, too, and my choice of medium was books. When I remember that and when I think about the sensory hell of most restaurants, I’m not bothered.

If family is looking for explicit evidence he loves them (which seems plausible to me as talking is my main form of bonding and we don’t talk much because he tends to prefer games in public) then they just have to look at how he reacts when someone walks in the room. Any time some new family member comes in the room (especially people who aren’t so strongly coded as adults, like his siblings even though we’re all 8-15 years older), he drops what he’s doing, yells their name, and runs to glomp onto them. (My family is nearly all allistic and almost as many are NT so there’s a lot of not understanding where my little brother is coming from.)

I’ve been to Stonehenge. It’s extremely windy. You can’t touch the stones because it’s roped off (I understand them wanting to preserve the stones, but still). You walk around in a circle and take pictures while being surrounded by a massive crowd of people who are doing the same thing.

Stonehenge is kind of like Mount Rushmore (which I’ve also been to) where it seems like a good time, but is disappointing up close. At least, to me.

I don’t blame the kid AT ALL because I’d also find the game more interesting.

(Source: plainpictures)

47,633 notes

[Image is of a desktop background, with a Word document opened:]

“Autistic Sherlock in Elementary
S2E1
I HAVEN’T SEEN THIS EPISODE SINCE MY 25TH BIRTHDAY LAST SEPTEMBER WHEN I WAS AT ST. ANDREWS
I’M EXCITED AND SCARED FOR THIS RE-WATCH”

[Image is of a desktop background, with a Word document opened:]

Autistic Sherlock in Elementary

S2E1

I HAVEN’T SEEN THIS EPISODE SINCE MY 25TH BIRTHDAY LAST SEPTEMBER WHEN I WAS AT ST. ANDREWS

I’M EXCITED AND SCARED FOR THIS RE-WATCH”

3 notes

lezbhonest:

Last summer, now we’re coming up on a year together <3
(she’s the cute one, I’m on the right)submission by iamsleeping

My friends are about to have their one year asdfghjkl LOOK AT HOW HAPPY THEY ARE ^_^

lezbhonest:

Last summer, now we’re coming up on a year together <3

(she’s the cute one, I’m on the right)
submission by 

My friends are about to have their one year asdfghjkl LOOK AT HOW HAPPY THEY ARE ^_^

(via gingersincardiff)

callmeoutis:

happy national get condescended to by sorority girls at the autism speaks table in the student center month

(via goldenheartedrose)

52 notes

Maybe a kickstarter with a bunch of people sending video clips (of which it would all be put into one) explaining how a con could be more inclusive?

2 notes

queerwatson said: there’s definitely a crowd for it! i guess if some of us banded together we could talk to some people and try a kickstarter or something like that??? we’d need an approximate budget first though, the whole thing’s so complicated

We need people that are good with numbers. Numbers give me headaches. But yes!

1 note

queerwatson said: i’ve thought about trying to start my own con that’s even more inclusive and much less bbc based than the current ones but the impression i’m given is that it takes quite a bit of money, and that’s not something i have in abundance

Rose and I were sort of just talking about the same thing

Money being a major problem as well

1 note

goldenheartedrose:

bendingthewillow:

goldenheartedrose:

bendingthewillow:

Rose, let me know if you got my fanmail (the internet connection as I sent it got weird)

If not, I can send it via private messaging

I didn’t!

D:

BRB!

I think that Tumblr has been screwing up with regards to fanmail etc.

Yeah. Sent you a message, so that should hopefully go through.

5 notes

goldenheartedrose:

bendingthewillow:

Rose, let me know if you got my fanmail (the internet connection as I sent it got weird)

If not, I can send it via private messaging

I didn’t!

D:

BRB!

5 notes

Rose, let me know if you got my fanmail (the internet connection as I sent it got weird)

If not, I can send it via private messaging

5 notes

I know BSB completely dismissed the possibility of BBC’s Sherlock being Autistic

Would they say the same for JLM!Holmes?

[I literally don’t know]

2 notes